Germany

Maultaschen – German Stuffed Pasta (two fillings)

January 29, 2017

Maultaschen is a big fat German version of ravioli. These dumplings are usually stuffed with meat and spinach mixture but I also made a vegetarian filling consisting of mashed potatoes, spinach, and topped with cream and mushrooms!

Maultaschen is a German version of Italian ravioli dumplings, only way bigger. This recipe features two different fillings: a traditional and a modern one! | cookingtheglobe.com

I love cooking, I really do. Even if the recipe is a challenging one and it takes a couple of attempts to get it right, I still enjoy the process. However, there are a few types of dishes that are not my cup of tea. When making them, the level of enjoyment reduces and sometimes, not too often, I can even get frustrated. One of such dishes is dumplings. All kinds of them. Ravioli, pelmeni, jiaozi, gyoza, it doesn’t matter. Each one of them is a challenge to me and I spend unthinkable amounts of time in the kitchen trying to master these evil creatures!

Maultaschen is a German version of Italian ravioli dumplings, only way bigger. This recipe features two different fillings: a traditional and a modern one! | cookingtheglobe.com

BUT. Here is another thing about me. I also love challenges. Not only in the kitchen, everywhere. You know, there are people who hate losing. Me – I love when somebody crushes me in basketball, bowling, anywhere. Be my guest. It means that I have a goal to get better and eventually win against my opponent. This feeling is amazing. It’s way better than just get an easy win all the time. That’s why I challenged myself today and made these German dumplings / stuffed pasta called Maultaschen. These are like big fat cousins of Italian raviolis!

Maultaschen is a German version of Italian ravioli dumplings, only way bigger. This recipe features two different fillings: a traditional and a modern one! | cookingtheglobe.com

The dish originated in the region of Swabia and sometimes is called Swabian Pockets. While it’s not surely known why these dumplings are called Maultaschen, Wikipedia offers a few interesting versions. First one suggests that the word derived from a combination of Maul (mouth of an animal) and Tasche (bag). It would mean feedbag then because of the appearance of the dumplings. The second version says that the name derived from an archaic word Maultatzen or Maultatschen, meaning slap in the face. How it’s related? You will laugh. It would be a comparison between a swollen cheek after being slapped with the shape and appearance of the dish!

Maultaschen is a German version of Italian ravioli dumplings, only way bigger. This recipe features two different fillings: a traditional and a modern one! | cookingtheglobe.com

But it’s not even the funniest part. A Swabian German nickname for this dish is Herrgottsbescheißerle, meaning “small God-cheaters”. Such a nickname was born because of a funny association of Maultaschen with the Lent days, when Christians abstain from eating meat. Germans say that the meat in this dish is hidden under a layer of pasta so the God can’t see it! Creative Germans, huh?

Maultaschen is a German version of Italian ravioli dumplings, only way bigger. This recipe features two different fillings: a traditional and a modern one! | cookingtheglobe.com

A few words about the dish itself. These big dumplings are usually stuffed with a combo of spinach, meat, onion, and bread. However, as you can imagine, today Maultaschen are made with a variety of different “modernized” fillings too. That’s why I decided to include both: a traditional meat-filled one and a “modern” vegetarian version filled with mashed potatoes, spinach, and topped with cream and mushrooms. I hope you will like them both!

Maultaschen is a German version of Italian ravioli dumplings, only way bigger. This recipe features two different fillings: a traditional and a modern one! | cookingtheglobe.com

Meat-filled (traditional) Maultaschen are often served in a chicken or beef broth, like some sort of a soup, but I decided to serve them with some sour cream or yogurt on top because that’s how I like my dumplings the most! It’s up to you, though. They are fantastic any way! Maultaschen is a German version of Italian ravioli dumplings, only way bigger. This recipe features two different fillings: a traditional and a modern one! | cookingtheglobe.com

5 from 9 votes
Maultaschen is a German version of Italian ravioli dumplings, only way bigger. This recipe features two different fillings: a traditional and a modern one! | cookingtheglobe.com
Print
Maultaschen Recipe - German Stuffed Pasta with Two Fillings
Prep Time
45 mins
Cook Time
1 hrs
Total Time
1 hrs 45 mins
 

Maultaschen is a German version of stuffed pasta or dumplings. This recipe offers two different fillings: a traditional and a modern one!

Cuisine: German
Servings: 6 people
Calories Per Serving: 478 kcal
Author: CookingTheGlobe
Ingredients
For the dough:
  • 3 eggs
  • 4 tablespoons water
  • 1 teaspoons salt
  • 4 cups flour
For the meat-spinach filling:
  • 1 lb (450g) fresh spinach , cooked, finely chopped, and drained
  • 1 cup minced cooked chicken, beef, or pork
  • 1 onion , grated
  • 4 slices white bread
  • 1/2 cup water or milk
  • salt and pepper , to taste
  • nutmeg , to taste
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 egg yolk beaten with 1 teaspoon water
For the spinach-potato filling:
  • 1 lb (450g) potatoes , unpeeled
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 1 onion , finely chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic , minced
  • 6 oz (170g) spinach , chopped
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 8 oz (225g) mushrooms , sliced
  • 6 sprigs fresh thyme
Instructions
  1. Either in a bowl or in a mixer, combine all the dough ingredients. Knead for about 10 minutes by hand or keep mixing in a mixer until you get a tight dough ball. Remove the dough from the bowl and wrap in plastic wrap. Let sit at room temperature for at least 30 minutes.

  2. Meanwhile, prepare the fillings. For the meat-spinach filling, mix the spinach, cooked meat, and grated onion in a bowl. Soak the bread slices in water or milk, squeeze, and crumble into the meat-spinach mixture. Season with salt, pepper, and nutmeg to taste. Add the eggs and mix until well blended.

  3. For the spinach-potato filling, boil the unpeeled potatoes for 25-30 minutes until done. Let cool until they can be handled and peel them. Pass the warm potatoes through a ricer or simply mash with a potato mashed until smooth. Let cool.

  4. In a saucepan, melt the butter and add the onion, garlic, and 1 teaspoon salt. Cook, stirring, for about 4-5 minutes, until the onion is translucent. Add the spinach and cook, stirring, for about 3 minutes, until wilted. Remove from heat and add the spinach mixture to the potato mixture. Mix well and set aside.

  5. Take the dough and cut it into portions. Lightly flour a work surface and roll each portion into a thin sheet. Cut each sheet into 3-inch (8 cm) squares. Put a heaping teaspoon of filling in the center of each square, moisten edges with the egg yolk mixed with water, and fold in half to form pockets. Press edges together firmly and crimp with a fork.

  6. For the spinach-meat filling, boil the dumplings in salted water for about 10 minutes. Serve in chicken or beef broth or simply topped with some yogurt.

  7. For the spinach-potato filling, preheat the oven to 350Β°F (180Β°C). Boil the dumplings in salted water for about 6-7 minutes. When done, transfer with a slotted spoon to a baking dish. Top with the sliced mushrooms and pour the cream evenly over the top. Arrange the thyme sprigs evenly around the dumplings and bake for about 20 minutes, until the mushrooms start to brown. Enjoy!

Recipe Notes
The amount of dough is measured for one of the fillings. If you want to make both of them, double the ingredients of the dough.

The traditional filling is adapted from The German Cookbook by Mimi Sheraton, the modern filling - from New German Cooking by Jeremy and Jessica Nolen

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28 Comments

  • Reply Liz @ I Heart Vegetables January 30, 2017 at 9:49 pm

    My husband and I have gotten into pasta making lately and it’s been so fun to learn! This recipe looks delicious!


    • Reply Igor February 2, 2017 at 10:42 am

      Yup, making pasta at home is a unique experience!

  • Reply Stephanie@ApplesforCJ January 30, 2017 at 10:37 pm

    I also love a good challenge! I’ve never attempted pasta making though. Love the sound of the veggie ones with spinach and potatoes!

    • Reply Igor February 2, 2017 at 10:35 pm

      Yeah, I loved that filling a little bit more while my wife loved the meat and spinach one πŸ™‚

  • Reply Tiffany January 31, 2017 at 12:13 am

    These look aaaaamazing! I would love to try the spinach and potato filling and I love the mushroom topping – yum!


    • Reply Igor February 2, 2017 at 10:35 pm

      You should definitely try them, Tiffany!

  • Reply Velva January 31, 2017 at 12:23 am

    These look delicious! They are like a cross between a ravioli and a periogi. The filling options are endless. Love it. Thanks for sharing.

    Velva


    • Reply Igor February 2, 2017 at 10:38 pm

      That’s right Velva. You can stuff these guys with anything you want to πŸ™‚

  • Reply Christine January 31, 2017 at 1:37 am

    What delicious looking dumplings! They remind me a little bit of spinach pie.


    • Reply Igor February 2, 2017 at 10:42 pm

      Thanks, Christine!

  • Reply sushma January 31, 2017 at 2:09 am

    My family loves mushroom and these looks so inviting.. definitely on my to do list.

    • Reply Igor February 2, 2017 at 10:43 pm

      I am glad you liked them, Sushma!

  • Reply Lindsay Cotter January 31, 2017 at 2:17 am

    Loved learning about the history behind these! Yes, I love being challenged in the kitchen too! You’ve done an amazing job with this recipe! They look wonderful!

    • Reply Igor February 2, 2017 at 10:45 pm

      Thank you, Lindsay! Yeah, these dumplings have the interesting history, that’s for sure πŸ™‚

  • Reply Elizabeth January 31, 2017 at 10:39 am

    This sounds like just the sort of thing I would absolutely love! Proper winter comfort food, this!


    • Reply Igor February 2, 2017 at 10:51 pm

      It really is, Elizabeth! πŸ™‚

  • Reply Bintu - Recipes From A Pantry January 31, 2017 at 1:16 pm

    I really adore mushrooms and this pasta dish looks such great comfort food. The fillings are perfect if you are a meat eater or a vegetarian I guess you could double up on the recipe if you didn’t like one of these fillings


    • Reply Igor February 2, 2017 at 10:52 pm

      I am really happy you liked this one, Bintu πŸ˜‰

  • Reply The Food Hunter January 31, 2017 at 3:09 pm

    They look delicious I will give both a try

    • Reply Igor February 2, 2017 at 10:53 pm

      Let me know how you liked them when you will πŸ˜‰

  • Reply Platter Talk January 31, 2017 at 4:00 pm

    Oh my word! These are so good looking. There are few things that are more comforting then stuffed pasta and with potatoes, spinach and mushrooms? In German dough??? Are you kidding me?


    • Reply Igor February 2, 2017 at 10:54 pm

      I am not, ha! These are really awesome πŸ™‚

  • Reply Jess Wright January 31, 2017 at 10:07 pm

    This looks like the definition of comfort food <3 O yummy! I've actually never heard of these but they DO look like big ravioli! My little boys would flip out if I made them these (any kind of pasta type dish is crazy popular in my house). Can't wait to try them πŸ™‚

    • Reply Igor February 2, 2017 at 10:56 pm

      You boys will surely love these dumplings, Jess. Do try them πŸ˜‰

  • Reply Michael February 5, 2017 at 3:03 pm

    As a German i must confess that I have never had proper Maultaschen. It is a Southern Germany dish. But We hope to explore our country soon for next foodtravels πŸ™‚ They look so good!! Best wishes from India, Michael and Elli


    • Reply Igor February 6, 2017 at 10:30 pm

      The bigger the country the more difficult is to know and try all the dishes out there πŸ™‚ Every region has its own specialty! Maultaschen are really good, though. You have to try them! Sending wishes back to India, Michael and Elli! πŸ™‚

  • Reply Agness of Run Agness Run February 19, 2017 at 4:44 pm

    It looks very delicious and easy to do! This could be a great dinner idea!


    • Reply Igor February 28, 2017 at 7:48 am

      Well, they do require some effort but it’s so worth it!

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